June is Busting Out All Over (Carousel), Oscar Hammerstein
……….(R. Rodgers)
Oh What A Beautiful Morning (Oklahoma), Oscar Hammerstein
……….(R. Rodgers)
The Grass So Little Has To Do, Emily Dickinson
Leaves of Grass (excerpts), Walt Whitman
Up A Lazy River, Hoagy Carmichael
The Mad Gardener’s Song, Lewis Carroll
Cheek to Cheek, Irving Berlin
As Times Goes By, Herman Hupfeld
Marry The Man Today (Guys and Dolls), Frank Loesser
I Wonder What The King Is Doing Tonight (Camelot), Alan Lerner
What Do The Simple Folk Do? (Camelot), Alan Lerner
I Whistle A Happy Tune (The King and I), Oscar Hammerstein
……….(R. Rodgers)
The Sunny Side of the Street, Dorothy Fields
Side by Side, Gus Kahn


 
 
 

June Is Bustin’ Out All Over (Carousel)
by Oscar Hammerstein (R. Rodgers)

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Oh What a Beautiful Morning (Oklahoma)
by Oscar Hammerstein (R. Rodgers)

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The Grass So Little Has To Do
by Emily Dickinson

The grass so little has to do,
A sphere of simple green
With only butterflies to brood
And bees to entertain.

And stir all day to pretty tunes
The breezes fetch along
And hold the sunshine in its lap
And bow to everything.

And thread the dews all night, like pearls,
And make itself so fine –
A duchess were too common
For such a noticing.

And even when it dies, to pass
In odors so divine,
As lowly spices gone to sleep,
Or amuletes of pine.

And then to dwell in sovereign barns,
And dream the days away –
The grass so little has to do,
I wish I were a hay!

 
 
 

Leaves of Grass (excerpts)
by Walt Whitman

A child said, What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;
How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is, any more than he.

I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.

Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,
A scented gift and remembrancer, designedly dropt,
Bearing the owner’s name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say,
Whose?

Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.

Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic;
And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,
Growing among black folks as among white;
Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.

* * *

Walt Whitman am I, a Kosmos, of mighty Manhattan the son,
Turbulent, fleshy and sensual, eating, drinking and breeding;
No sentimentalist——no stander above men and women, or apart from them;
No more modest than immodest.

* * *

I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars,
And a grain of sand is equally perfect, and the egg of the wren,
And the running blackberry would adorn the parlors of heaven,
And the narrowest hinge in my hand puts to scorn all machinery,
And the cow crunching with depress’d head surpasses any statue,
And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels,

* * *

And I say to mankind, Be not curious about God,
For I, who am curious about each, am not curious about God.

I hear and behold God in every object, yet understand God not in the least,

Why should I wish to see God better than this day?
I see something of God each hour of the twenty-four, and each moment then;
In the faces of men and women I see God, and in my own face in the glass;
I find letters from God dropt in the street – and every one is sign’d by God’s name,
And I leave them where they are, for I know that wheresoe’er I go,
Others will punctually come forever and ever.

 
 
 

Up A Lazy River
by Hoagy Carmichael

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The Mad Garderner’s Song
by Lewis Carroll

He thought he saw an Elephant,
That practiced on a fife:
He looked again, and found it was
A letter from his wife.
‘At length I realise,’ he said,
The bitterness of Life!’

He thought he saw a Buffalo
Upon the chimney-piece:
He looked again, and found it was
His Sister’s Husband’s Niece.
‘Unless you leave this house,’ he said,
‘I’ll send for the Police!’

He thought he saw a Rattlesnake
That questioned him in Greek:
He looked again, and found it was
The Middle of Next Week.
‘The one thing I regret,’ he said,
‘Is that it cannot speak!’

He thought he saw a Banker’s Clerk
Descending from the bus:
He looked again, and found it was
A Hippopotamus.
‘If this should stay to dine,’ he said,
‘There won’t be much for us!’

He thought he saw a Kangaroo
That worked a coffee-mill:
He looked again, and found it was
A Vegetable-Pill.
‘Were I to swallow this,’ he said,
‘I should be very ill!’

He thought he saw a Coach-and-Four
That stood beside his bed:
He looked again, and found it was
A Bear without a Head.
‘Poor thing,’ he said, ‘poor silly thing!
It’s waiting to be fed!’

He thought he saw an Albatross
That fluttered round the lamp:
He looked again, and found it was
A Penny-Postage Stamp.
‘You’d best be getting home,’ he said:
‘The nights are very damp!’

He thought he saw a Garden-Door
That opened with a key:
He looked again, and found it was
A Double Rule of Three:
‘And all its mystery,’ he said,
‘Is clear as day to me!’

He thought he saw an Argument
That proved he was the Pope:
He looked again, and found it was
A Bar of Mottled Soap.
‘A fact so dread,’ he faintly said,
‘Extinguishes all hope!’

 
 
 

Cheek to Cheek
by Irving Berlin

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As Time Goes By
by Herman Hupfeld

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Marry The Man Today (Guys and Dolls)
by Frank Loesser

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I Wonder What The King is Doing Tonight (Camelot)
by Alan Lerner

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What Do The Simple Folk Do? (Camelot)
by Alan Lerner

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I Whistle a Happy Tune (The King and I)
by Oscar Hammerstein (R. Rodgers)

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The Sunny Side of the Street
by Dorothy Fields

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Side by Side
by Gus Kahn

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